Artificial Sweeteners That Are Approved By FSSAI

Sugar is the most commonly used ingredient in foods. It is found in baked foods like cakes and breads and processed foods like crackers and candies as well. One teaspoon of corn syrup, which is a type of sugar, contains 20 calories, and one teaspoon of white sugar has 15 calories.1 On an average, the […]

Sugar is the most commonly used ingredient in foods. It is found in baked foods like cakes and breads and processed foods like crackers and candies as well. One teaspoon of corn syrup, which is a type of sugar, contains 20 calories, and one teaspoon of white sugar has 15 calories.1 On an average, the per capita sugar consumption in India is 20.0 kg.2 According to the data procured from the sugar trade industry of India in the year 2013, India consumes the largest amount of sugar and is the second largest producer of sugar in the world.3

Due to the rising incidence of lifestyle diseases like diabetes, the consumption of sugar substitutes has increased. Sugar substitutes are sweeteners that sweeten foods without adding the calories of sucrose (sugar).4 Sugar substitutes or artificial sweeteners do not add nutritional value to food. Most sweeteners are very low in their calorific value, and some do not have calories at all.

For this reason, the American Heart Association has labelled artificial, low calorie, or non‑caloric sweeteners as non-nutritive sweeteners.5, 6

The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) has approved six artificial sweeteners, namely saccharin sodium, aspartame, acesulfame potassium, sucralose, neotame, and isomaltulose for use in food.

  • Saccharin sodium

Saccharin sodium is currently being used in beverages like fruit juices, mixes and bases, as a sugar substitute in cooking and serving, in processed foods. Saccharin is approximately 200 to 700 times sweeter than the usual table sugar (sucrose) and has 0 calories. More than 30 studies have proved saccharin sodium to be safe for humans.7 FSSAI recommends the maximum permitted levels of saccharin sodium in the following foods as below:

Food item Maximum limit of saccharin
(ppm = parts per million)
Carbonated water 100 ppm
Pan masala 8,000 ppm
Traditional sweets 500 ppm
Chocolate 500 ppm
Sugar-free confectionery/sugar-based confectionery 3,000 ppm
Bubblegum/Chewing gum 3,000 ppm

 

  • Aspartame

It has no calories and is approximately 200 times sweeter than table sugar. Aspartame loses its sweetness when it is heated, which is the reason it is not used in baked goods. Results of more than 100 studies state the safety of aspartame.7 FSSAI recommends the maximum permitted levels of aspartame in the following foods as seen below:

Food item Maximum limit of aspartame
(ppm = parts per million)
Carbonated water 700 ppm
Traditional sweets 200 ppm
Breads, pastries, biscuits and cakes 2,200 ppm
Jellies, marmalades and jams 1,000 ppm
Chocolate 2,000 ppm
Sugar-free confectionery/sugar-based confectionery 10,000 ppm
Bubblegum/Chewing gum 10,000 ppm
Custard powder mix 1,000 ppm
Flavored milk 600ppm
Vegetable/fruit nectar 600ppm
Frozen desserts, pudding and ice cream 1000ppm
Yoghurt 600ppm
Ready to serve tea/coffee based beverages 600ppm

 

  • Acesulfame potassium

Acesulfame is often used in combination with other sweeteners and is approximately 200 times sweeter than table sugar. Acesulfame potassium remains sweet even when used in high-temperature cooking like baking. It is usually used in candies, beverages, baked goods and frozen desserts. Results of more than 90 studies state the safety of acesulfame’s.7 FSSAI recommends the maximum permitted levels of acesulfame in the following foods as below:

Food item Maximum limit of acesulfame potassium
(ppm = parts per million)
Carbonated water 300 ppm
Traditional sweets 500 ppm
Biscuits, cakes, pastries and bread 1,000 ppm
Bubblegum/Chewing gum  5,000 ppm
Chocolate 500 ppm
Sugar-free confectionery/sugar-based confectionery 3,500 ppm
Ready-to-serve coffee-based beverages and tea bags 600 ppm
Ice candy/ice lollies 800 ppm
Fruit nectars 300 ppm

 

  • Sucralose

It is approximately 600 times sweeter than table sugar. Sucralose stays sweet even when used in high-temperature cooking like baking. It is usually used in frozen dairy desserts, gelatins, chewing gums, baked goods and beverages.7 FSSAI recommends the maximum permitted levels of acesulfame in the following foods as below:

Food item Maximum limit of sucralose
(ppm = parts per million)
Carbonated water 300 ppm
Breads, biscuits(including cookies), pastries and cakes 750 ppm
Traditional sweets 750 ppm
Ice cream/kulfi/dried ice cream mixes/ frozen desert 400 ppm
Chocolate 800ppm
Yoghurt 300 ppm
Chutney 800 ppm
Jellies, jams and marmalades 450 ppm
Confectionery 1,500 ppm
Muffins/Scones/Doughnuts 800 ppm
Ready-to-serve coffee-based beverages and tea bags 600 ppm
Chewing gum 1,250 ppm
Ice candy/ice lollies 800 ppm
Vegetable juice/nectars 250 ppm
Ready to eat custard desert/custard powder 260ppm
  • Neotame

It is 7,000 to 13,000 times sweeter than table sugar and is 30 to 60 times sweeter than aspartame. Neotame is a derivative of aspartame.8 FSSAI recommends the use of neotame in soft drinks only. It is permitted at a maximum limit of 33 parts per million.9

  • Isomaltulose

Isomaltulose is a recent addition to the list of artificial sweeteners. FSSAI permits the use of isomaltulose in confectionary products only. The maximum limit of isomaltulose usage should be 50 percent of the total sugar content of the product without causing any major effects to the product’s stability. Isomlatulose is not allowed for in edible ices and ice lollies from the category of confectionary products. FSSAI permits the usage of isomaltulose as an artificial sweetener in the following products at GMP Level:

  • Chocolate
  • Bubble gum/Chewing gum
  • Lozenges
  • Sugar free confectionery/sugar based confectionery

As increased sugar consumption in daily foods has become a growing trend, FSSAI has been making amends to the standard regulations and food safety in regards to artificial sweeteners. It educates manufacturers about the healthy levels of artificial sugars in manufacturing products that use artificial sweeteners to strike a balance between a healthy amounts of artificial sweetener consumption for consumers without compromising on the taste of the foods for manufacturers.

References:

  1. How Much Sugar Do You Eat? You May Be Surprised! [Internet]. Available at: https://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/nhp/documents/sugar.pdf Accessed on Oct 26, 2018.
  2. Lakhs of Indians becoming sugar dependent [Internet]. Available at: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/diet/Lakhs-of-Indians-becoming-sugar-dependent/articleshow/19456525.cms Accessed on Oct 26, 2018.
  3. Department of Food & Public Distribution [Internet] [Updated May 24, 2018]. Available at:http://dfpd.nic.in/sugar.htm Accessed on Oct 26, 2018.
  4. Get the Facts: Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Consumption [Internet] [Updated Oct 23, 2018]. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/data-statistics/sugar-sweetened-beverages-intake.html Accessed on Oct 26, 2018.
  5. Sugar Substitutes [Internet] [Updated May 10, 2017]. Available at: https://familydoctor.org/sugar-substitutes/ Accessed on Oct 26, 2018.
  6. Non-Nutritive Sweeteners (Artificial Sweeteners) [Internet]. Available at: http://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/sugar/nonnutritive-sweeteners-artificial-sweeteners Accessed on Oct 26, 2018.
  7. Additional Information about High-Intensity Sweeteners Permitted for Use in Food in the United States [Internet] [Updated Aug 2, 2018]. Available at: https://www.fda.gov/food/ingredientspackaginglabeling/foodadditivesingredients/ucm37725.htm Accessed on Oct 26, 2018.
  8. Chattopadhyay S, Raychaudhuri U, Charkraborty R; Journal of Food Science and Technology. Artificial sweeteners- a review. 2014 Apr; 51(4): 611–621
  9. Sesikeran B. Artificial Sweeteners in India [Internet]. Available at: http://www.ilsi-india.org/PDF/scientific-conference-on-low-calorie-non-nutritive-sweeteners-uses-&-safety/Uses%20Of%20Low%20Calorie%20Non%20Nutritive%20Sweeteners%20Indian%20Perspective%20Dr.%20B%20Sesikeran%20Former%20Director%20National%20Institute%20of%20%20Nutrition%20%20%20.pdf Accessed on Oct 26, 2018.

Enquire Now

To enquire about our services please complete the form below and we will be in tough with you as soon as possible

Error :   Please complete captcha first

Food Regulatory Services

  • Consumer Product
  • Compliance Services
  • Licenses
All rights are reserved @ 2021
Enquire now